Posted on

Health A-Z Archives: Sports Drinks

The enormous financial rewards generated by various sports disciplines have created a market for specialized foods ‘guaranteed’ to enhance physical performance within the legal limits.

Now what about sports or energy drinks?  Personally, I would not recommend that you give them to your child.  To show you why, I have given you a breakdown of two of the most popular sports drinks around and then a breakdown of pasteurised grape juice.  The results speak for themselves.

Most sports drinks that I have come into contact with advertise that they contain carbohydrates and minerals that are absorbed into the bloodstream faster than water, thereby providing both energy and fluid.  However, carefully controlled studies have indicated that these sports drinks actually reach the blood much more slowly than water.  The American College of Sports Medicine recently condemned these drinks and was dismissive of the idea that they are superior to water.

Let’s take a look at that breakdown.

Popular Energy Drink.  The following 16 ingredients are listed:

  • Water
  • Enzymatic Partial Hydrolysate of Corn Starch.  This has a similar effect to refined sugar in that it upset glucose levels in the body and affects the endocrine system negatively
  • Maltodextrin.  A natural sweetener derived from barley malt.  No side-effects known
  • Citric Acid.  Found naturally in most plant foods.  No known side-effects other than that it can erode tooth enamel.
  • Dextrose.  This is basically refined glucose and can have similar effect to sugar
  • Salt
  • Cloudifier.  (Unspecified – this could be one of many)
  • Sodium Cyclamate.  This is considered to be carcinogenic and has similar effects to saccharin (see below)
  • Sodium Saccharin.  There is now clear evidence that this can contribute to bladder cancer and tumours in the urinary tract.  Sports people make efficient use of their urinary tract during exercise, so it seems strange to me that this harmful substance is added to a ‘sports drink’.  Saccharin may also contribute to other forms of cancer.
  • Vitamin C.  Synthetic vitamin C can cause kidney stones, gout, arthritis and ulcers, as well as heart disease.  The vitamin C found naturally in foods such as fruit and vegetables is extremely important to overall health and does not have any detrimental side-effects
  • Mono-Potassium Phosphate.  Can lead to loss of calcium and cause kidney damage
  • Di-Potassium Phosphate (as above)
  • Flavourant.  Unspecified – this could be one of dozens, including the toxic MSG
  • Colourants.  Unspecified – again, there are many in common use.  Tartrazine is particularly popular and is used in yellow, green or orange coloured drinks.  It can cause asthma, migraines, hyperactivity and skin rashes.  It has also been found to cause a deficiency in other vitamins and minerals, and new research indicates that it may play a role in heart disease
  • Sorbic Acid.  High levels can irritate the nose, eyes and throat
  • Benzoic Acid.  This preservative causes allergies and intolerances, and results in asthma, urticaria and hyperactivity

    Popular Power Drink.  This contains 23 different ingredients in all, many of which are common to the drink above.  It also lists the following:

  • Sugar.  This upsets blood sugar levels and in turn, the endocrine system which controls muscle tone and development, energy levels, metabolism and, in fact, almost every body function
  • Sodium Hexametaphosphate.  This can lead to a loss of calcium and cause kidney damage
  • Potassium Benzoate.  This can trigger asthma, urticaria and hyperactivity
  • Potassium Sorbate.  No real research has been done on humans
  • Stabilisers.  This could be one of many different types, usually artificial or chemical in nature
  • Potassium Citrate.  Presumed safe
  • Tartrazine.  This colourant can cause a wide range of allergic and intolerant symptoms, including hyperactivity, asthma, migraines and skin rashes

    Grape Juice Per 100g.  Now let’s take a look at a natural alternative to meeting your sporting child’s energy and hydration requirements:

  • Carbohydrates (57g)
  • Vitamin A (13.9g mg)
  • Vitamin B (10.1g mg)
  • Glucose (56g)
  • Kilojoules (235)
  • Calcium (5 mg)
  • Protein (0.1g)
  • Iron (0.5mg)
  • Magnesium (7mg)
  • Phosphorous (11mg)
  • Potassium (42mg)
  • Sodium (4mg)

    Zinc (0.22mg)

    Ø      Vitamin C (23mg)

    Ø      Copper (0.22mg)

    Ø      Manganese (0.32mg)

  • As you can see from the above breakdown, grape juice contains a wide range of nutrients needed for optimum activity and has no detrimental side effects.  Don’t waste your money on sports drinks – the only thing that they will achieve, will be to compromise your child’s health and performance on the sports field. Sports Drinks

  • The enormous financial rewards generated by various sports disciplines have created a market for specialised foods ‘guaranteed’ to enhance physical performance within the legal limits.

    Now what about sports or energy drinks?  Personally, I would not recommend that you give them to your child.  To show you why, I have given you a breakdown of two of the most popular sports drinks around and then a breakdown of pasteurised grape juice.  The results speak for themselves.

    Most sports drinks that I have come into contact with advertise that they contain carbohydrates and minerals that are absorbed into the bloodstream faster than water, thereby providing both energy and fluid.  However, carefully controlled studies have indicated that these sports drinks actually reach the blood much more slowly than water.  The American College of Sports Medicine recently condemned these drinks and was dismissive of the idea that they are superior to water.

    Let’s take a look at that breakdown.

    Popular Energy Drink.  The following 16 ingredients are listed:

    Water

    Enzymatic Partial Hydrolysate of Corn Starch.  This has a similar effect to refined sugar in that it upset glucose levels in the body and affects the endocrine system negatively

    Ø      Maltodextrin.  A natural sweetener derived from barley malt.  No side-effects known

    Citric Acid.  Found naturally in most plant foods.  No known side-effects other than that it can erode tooth enamel.

    Dextrose.  This is basically refined glucose and can have similar effect to sugar

    Salt

    Cloudifier.  (Unspecified – this could be one of many)

    Sodium Cyclamate.  This is considered to be carcinogenic and has similar effects to saccharin (see below)

    Sodium Saccharin.  There is now clear evidence that this can contribute to bladder cancer and tumours in the urinary tract.  Sports people make efficient use of their urinary tract during exercise, so it seems strange to me that this harmful substance is added to a ‘sports drink’.  Saccharin may also contribute to other forms of cancer.

    Ø      Vitamin C.  Synthetic vitamin C can cause kidney stones, gout, arthritis and ulcers, as well as heart disease.  The vitamin C found naturally in foods such as fruit and vegetables is extremely important to overall health and does not have any detrimental side-effects

    Ø    Mono-Potassium Phosphate.  Can lead to loss of calcium and cause kidney damage

    Di-Potassium Phosphate (as above)

    Flavourant.  Unspecified – this could be one of dozens, including the toxic MSG

    Colourants.  Unspecified – again, there are many in common use.  Tartrazine is particularly popular and is used in yellow, green or orange coloured drinks.  It can cause asthma, migraines, hyperactivity and skin rashes.  It has also been found to cause a deficiency in other vitamins and minerals, and new research indicates that it may play a role in heart disease

    Sorbic Acid.  High levels can irritate the nose, eyes and throat

    Benzoic Acid.  This preservative causes allergies and intolerances, and results in asthma, urticaria and hyperactivity.

    Popular Power Drink.  This contains 23 different ingredients in all, many of which are common to the drink above.  It also lists the following:

    Ø      Sugar.  This upsets blood sugar levels and in turn, the endocrine system which controls muscle tone and development, energy levels, metabolism and, in fact, almost every body function

    Ø      Sodium Hexametaphosphate.  This can lead to a loss of calcium and cause kidney damage

    Ø      Potassium Benzoate.  This can trigger asthma, urticaria and hyperactivity

    Ø      Potassium Sorbate.  No real research has been done on humans

    Ø      Stabilisers.  This could be one of many different types, usually artificial or chemical in nature

    Ø      Potassium Citrate.  Presumed safe

    Ø      Tartrazine.  This colourant can cause a wide range of allergic and intolerant symptoms, including hyperactivity, asthma, migraines and skin rashes

    Grape Juice Per 100g.  Now let’s take a look at a natural alternative to meeting your sporting child’s energy and hydration requirements:

    Ø      Carbohydrates (57g)

    Ø      Vitamin A (13.9g)                   {MA, is this g or mg?}

    Ø      Vitamin B (10.1g) …………….{Please double check}

    Ø      Glucose (56g)

    Ø      Kilojoules (235)

    Ø      Calcium (5 mg)

    Ø      Protein (0.1g)

    Ø      Iron (0.5mg)

    Ø      Magnesium (7mg)

    Ø      Phosphorous (11mg)

    Ø      Potassium (42mg)

    Ø      Sodium (4mg)

    Ø      Zinc (0.22mg)

    Ø      Vitamin C (23mg)

    Ø      Copper (0.22mg)

    Ø      Manganese (0.32mg)

    As you can see from the above breakdown, grape juice contains a wide range of nutrients needed for optimum activity and has no detrimental side-effects.  Don’t waste your money on sports drinks – the only thing that they will achieve, will be to compromise your child’s health and performance on the sports field.

    Distilled water from my new book “Perfect Weight- The Natural Way”

    Distilled water has an acid pH, which usually results in a loss of alkaline minerals such as calcium, magnesium and potassium. This can put tremendous strain on the heart for example. Dr Zoltan P. Rona actually states that “early death comes from distilled water”, which is quite the opposite of what the distilled water peddlers claim.

    “Fasting using distilled water can be dangerous because of rapid loss of electrolytes (sodium, potassium, chloride) and trace minerals such as magnesium, deficiencies which can cause heart beat irregularities and high blood pressure. According to the US Environmental Protection Agency, “Distilled water, being essentially mineral free, is very aggressive, in that it tends to dissolve substances with which it is in contact. Notably, carbon dioxide from the air is rapidly absorbed, making water acidic and even more aggressive. Many metals are dissolved by distilled water”


100-days-logo Header Only 300

Sign up now for our FREE 100 Days to Health newsletter!

You get 100 daily emails full of natural health information, health tips, and healthy recipes to help change your life. We help you take small steps and begin integrating The 5 Basic Steps of Natural Health,  based on The Natural Way, 30+ years of research, integration, and education by Mary-Ann Shearer.

If you are ready to take steps and improve your health like thousands of others, sign up for our newsletter, purchase our support products and get started! Healthy Eating + Healthy Choices = Healthy Living

The post Health A-Z Archives: Sports Drinks appeared first on 100 Days to Health.